8 of the best movies based on true stories

good comrades

Why do we love true stories? Does the fact that it’s based on real events somehow make her more cautious? Do they give us something tangible to aspire to? Or does the fact that these people exist, and that these events actually do occur, convey a sense of credibility on the big screen?

If there is any truth to any of these questions, we need look no further than Martin Scorsese’s question good comrades As a prime example of a film based on a true story that inspires, charms and frightens us at once, while at the same time feeling vividly, intensely original. People may be martyred The Godfather As the greatest movie in the gangster genre, but I’d trade Don Corleone, a king sitting atop a fantasy crime empire, with Henry Hill, a real mafia-turned-rat who’s willing to do anything and everything to save his skin, any day of the week. Ashley Carter (Editor)

Fargo

Look, it says it’s based on a true story, so it should be based on a true story. Forget what Google says. Regardless, this is one of the greatest movies ever made – and the coolest outing for the Coen brothers (consolations to No country for all men). With a sharp and unique script brought to life by the extraordinary performances of all the cast – from Frances McDormand’s lovable but no-nonsense portrayal of Police Chief Marge Gunderson to a totally bland rendering of Steve Buscemi – this is big-screen entertainment at its best. Writing this made me want to watch Fargo For the fiftieth time? Oh, Pecha. George White (Assistant Editor)

Memories of the murder

Memories of the murder is a 2003 thriller about the first confirmed – and until recently unsolved – Korean serial murders of the 1980s, and the desperate attempts of detectives to find the killer. Although we knew from the start that the officers’ efforts were in vain, director Bong Joon-h’s second feature is a wonderfully varied watch that includes moments of surprisingly integrated comedy and scenes so scary that they wouldn’t be out of place. In a horror movie.

When making the movie, Bong hoped the offender would see the horrific final shot of Song Kang-ho staring straight into the camera and feeling remorse for his actions. The real killer finally comes clean in 2019, as it turns out he’s already been in prison since 1994 for killing his sister-in-law – and although that’s unlikely Memories of the murder It had something to do with the confession, which his cellmate claimed they had seen on TV three times. Jimmy Morris (screen editor)

Spotlight

Real journalism. We heard he died. It has been replaced by clickbait headlines and endless press writing. But somewhere in between it all, there is still writing that is important and makes a difference in the world we live in. This was filmed in the 2015 Tom McCarthy movie Spotlight. With a cast including Rachel McAdams, Mark Ruffalo, and Michael Keaton, a real-life story follows Boston GlobeScouts discover sexual abuse in the Roman Catholic Church. Exploring a story that shook Boston society, the film’s brilliance lies in its nuance, capturing the complex and conflicting feelings of journalists, most of whom have strong cultural and familial ties to the Catholic community. A heartbreaking, thought-provoking and thrilling movie, Spotlight worth your time. Lizzie O’Riordan (Editing Assistant)

Schindler’s List

Schindler’s List A difficult and intense film to watch, it tells the true story of German industrialist Oskar Schindler, who rescued about a thousand Jews during World War II. This shocking movie shows the cold truth of treating people badly; They were shot in the middle of the streets and the SS drove them to their deaths. Families were torn apart, bribery proliferated — and a hostile climate created, hopefully never again. Produced and directed by Steven Spielberg in 1993, it is still regarded as one of the saddest films ever made, showing the true atrocities suffered during the Holocaust. Marta Tavares

Apollo 13

In April 1970, an oxygen tank exploded on Apollo 13, the third manned flight to the Moon, 200,000 miles from Earth, leaving the three men inside unable to accomplish their mission and unsure of how to get home. Captain Jim Lovell (portrayed by the ever-strong Tom Hanks) was the king of cuts when he famously broadcast: “Houston, we’ve got a problem.”

Ron Howard Apollo 13 It covers the technical aspects well, but where it really excels is in showing the emotional impact the missions have on the families of astronauts. Everything – from being unable to hug due to quarantine rules to a solidarity pat on the back from a teacher to Lovell’s son incessantly watching footage of the landing attempt – presents a time when we can unite around humanity’s glorious ambitions and join together to console ourselves when this goes wrong. The tension is still incredibly tense, even if you know how it ends. Sue Barsby

Moneyball

I don’t get the whole game of baseball – it takes too long and is played almost exclusively in time zones that are less than favorable to UK audiences. but i love Moneyball.

It took me a while to realize that I genuinely loved this movie, and not just the idea of ​​taking part in American sports, which quickly faded away, and it’s hard to say exactly why. This might be my favorite Brad Pitt performance (eleventh ocean though), and every supporting actor totally carries his weight. The movie’s simple gist is “I want Brad Pitt to win his silly game, and spend time with his daughter.” The soundtrack is excellent and the dialogue is some of the best I’ve seen in any movie; It seems like a lot of movies don’t get the concept of how real humans interact with each other, but this isn’t one of those. Michael Vince

Pat Garrett and Billy Baby

Suits don’t know what to do with them Pat Garrett and Billy BabyAfter which the film was butchered by the studios (six editors co-credited) so much that the director wanted his name removed from the project. But this conflict seems racist to the film itself – as with most Sam Peckinpah films – in the sense that Peckinpah’s vision of the West itself is in tatters.

Notorious outlaw Billy the Kid finds himself on the run, pursued only by his old companion, Sheriff Pat Jarrett. The meandering cat-and-mouse chase did actually happen in the movie, but I’m sure Peckinpah and his team took some liberties – but who didn’t? Either way, it’s a gem of a West that boasts superb performances from James Coburn and Kris Kristofferson, with a supporting cast that reads like who’s who of the great ’70s actors like Harry Dean Stanton. Above all, the score by the great Bob Dylan encapsulates the bloody relationship in a tight, sad coat. Aaron Rowe

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