Apple has received a patent related to virtual paper that will be used in augmented and virtual environments

Today, the US Patent and Trademark Office has officially granted Apple a patent relating to the future use of virtual paper on devices that will be able to tear, flip, fold and bend while keeping graphics intact in various positions while changing the virtual paper’s angles and projections. The virtual sheet can include 2D and 3D mixed reality content and animation where the image can constantly change depending on a particular situation in it. These are very cool things that are in the works right now.

The patent isn’t really intended for consumers, though we’ll eventually be able to enjoy virtual paper on our future head-mounted devices, like the iPhone and iPad.

While the patent appears to be geared toward developers, consumers will one day interact with virtual paper on iPhones, iPads, and Mixed Reality Headsets.

In the big picture, Apple’s patent covers hardware, devices, systems, and methods for interfering with holograms and matching virtual content to a virtual paper.

Apple notes that unlike previously available computer-generated reality (CGR) systems, the various embodiments disclosed in their patent filing provide CGR Multidimensional Environment. In some embodiments, the CGR multi-dimensional environment includes a virtual paper rendering that is represented as a specific surface or limited area.

For example, while rendering the default 3D content so that the default 3D content is restricted within the contour of the virtual sheet, The virtual 3D content can stand out from the first side of the virtual sheet, The display of virtual 3D content is based on the second set of world coordinates.

On the other hand, the virtual 2D content is displayed as corresponding to the surface of the virtual sheet based on the first set of world coordinates. In some embodiments, the second side of the virtual sheet, which is the opposite of the first side of the virtual sheet (for example, the back side), is rendered with an identical bitmap representation of the virtual 3D content, for example, a blur effect or shadow of the virtual 3D content, Together with the corresponding bitmap representation of the 2D virtual content.

In some models, the original user’s CGR environment is the CGR environment in them User or avatar The user represents. For example, the CGR environment (#400) includes a user (#401) or an avatar representing the user. As such, the scene was filmed in FIG. Figure 4A below can be a view of the CGR environment from a user or bystander perspective.

In addition, we see patents in FIG. 4A below the 2D text “Matrix” (#410) appears to float on the front side surface of the virtual sheet (#405), and the 3D chicken (#420) appears to be inside the virtual sheet.

As such, the 2D text appears to be “arrayed” in front of (eg, overlaid) the 3D chicken from the user’s perspective. Accordingly, the 2D text “Matrix” covers part of the 3D chicken vertex inside the virtual sheet.

Apple patented FIG. Figure 4B shows the back side of the virtual sheet with the chicken, and the selected surface (#405) looks translucent or semi-transparent, so we can see an outline of a blurred chicken image with only the tip of the beak at the far right of the image to show you that the graphic follows the movement of the virtual sheet .

Next, the patent goes as deep as 10 miles into illumination, bitmaps, spheroids, and pixel depths that the average reader would miss.

As shown in patent fig. 4C-4E Above, during the transformation of the width of the virtual sheet, the width of the virtual contents associated with the virtual sheet also shifts in response to the transformation of the circumference of the virtual sheet. For example, parts of a 3D chicken protrude from one side of the virtual sheet where the virtual sheet or virtual page is flipped.

In the Apple patent fig. 4L and 4M below, Apple notes that in addition to the virtual 3D chicken holographic object displayed in a web page, the 3D chicken head can be moved by rotating, blinking, etc.

The Apple patent outlines the use of Virtual Paper in future applications such as Apple Maps, Apple Music, other travel-related applications and obviously books, magazines, etc. In the FIG patent. In Figure 5i below, Apple tells us that a consumer who sees an image on a mall ad or magazine will be able to flip the boat over with a gesture to view different parts of the ship and so on.

3 Figs Virtual Paper Patent Apple 4 Liters 4 Meters And 5 Eyes

In the FIG patent. 5i above, Apple tells us that a consumer who sees an image on a mall ad or magazine will be able to flip the boat over with a gesture to view different parts of the ship and so on.

In the FIG patent. In Figure 5i below, Apple tells us that a consumer who sees an image on a mall ad or magazine will be able to flip the boat over with a gesture to view different parts of the ship and so on.

For more details, see patent granted to Apple 113,28497.

10.52FX - Stripe Patent Granted

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