Nicole Kidman: 10 Essential Movies

Born in Honolulu, Australian/American superstar Nicole Kidman has rarely been out of the spotlight since getting her first on-screen credit with a minor role in the Australian fashion industry group TV The 1983 film Skin Deep. Kidman was a witty, intelligent actress with a broader emotional and tonal range than she is often credited with, establishing herself as one of the highest-paid stars of her generation.

However, not all points were high: the breakdown of her marriage to Hollywood golden boy Tom Cruise, accusations of isolation from the media and her appearances in some less than star-studded films (Invasion, I’m Looking at You) have presented them with your own off-screen and on-screen challenges over the years.

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Fast forward to 2017, however, and Kidman appears to be in the best health both personally and professionally. Roles in both the Small Indies such as Strangerland (2015) and in highly anticipated productions such as Jane Campion’s soon-to-be-released TV The mini-series Top of the Lake: China Girl showed that Kidman still had a desire to take on interesting roles.

BMX Bandit (1983)

Director: Brian Trenchard Smith

Bandits BMX (1983)

1983 was a big year for 16-year-old Kidman, with supporting roles in three Australian films as well as a starring role in Brian Trenchard-Smith’s knockabout crime caper. BMX Bandits. As Jodi, one of three teenage bikers who brought down a gang of bank robbers, Kidman is the energetic, energetic heart of Trenchard Smith’s action-packed family adventure. proves her natural in front of the camera, BMX The bandits were an unforgettable first step in Kidman’s career.

Hilton Bangkok (TV1989)

Hilton Bangkok (1989)

At the end of the 1980s, Kidman appeared in two productions that would seal her status as a rising star: Phillip Noyce’s Dead Calm and the three-part Ken Cameron. TV Hilton Bangkok mini series. In the lead role of Katrina Stanton, Kidman presided over an impressive cast that included Denholm Elliot, Hugo Weaving, and Judy Morris in a heart-wrenching, life-or-death story of wrongful imprisonment, betrayal and family love. Kidman confidently carries out Katrina’s journey, from reclusive heiress to prison escape of worldly wisdom, in this well-acclaimed small-screen drama.

Dead Quiet (1989)

Director: Philip Noyce

Dead Quiet (1989)

Kidman drew international stardom after her performance as Ray Ingram in Philip Noyce’s 1963 adaptation of Charles Williams’ novel Dead Calm. A tense, claustrophobic psychological thriller set on a yacht in the Pacific Ocean, Dead Calm is, for most of its run, vertical between Kidman’s endangered Ray and psychotic captor Billy Zane Heggy. Kidman, who was only 22 years old at the time, showed real commitment and drive in taking on a challenging role that was heavy on physical labor and emotional acting.

To Die For (1995)

To Die For (1995)

Kidman deservedly won Best Actress at the 1996 Golden Globe Awards for her stunning portrayal of the murderous, media-obsessed Susan Stone Marito, Machiavellian. TV The weather girl in Gus Van Sant’s black comedy that critics lauded to die for. An irresistible blend of steely design, charming naivety, and ultimately, ruthless cruelty, Kidman’s Stone-Maretto is a fine encapsulation of the lengths some people would go to for fame in the age of multimedia. Kidman has rarely, if ever, been in better shape.

Moulin Rouge! (2001)

Moulin Rouge! (2001)

As hard as it was to stand out amidst the wild, sparkling visual designs of Baz Luhrmann’s musical Moulin Rouge, Kidman managed to do just that as a star actress and a Satin cabaret actress. Kidman is cast alongside Ewan McGregor (as Christian English writer and poet), in a pop-culture romance filled with high energy, emotion, and daring tailored sequences. Kidman broke a rib during a physically demanding photoshoot, before being nominated for Best Actress at the 2002 Academy Awards for her efforts.

birthday girl (2001)

Director: Jess Butterworth

birthday girl (2001)

After high-profile roles in Moulin Rouge! and The Others (2001), as well as an equally high-profile divorce from Tom Cruise, Kidman ended 2001 by starring in the totally British romantic comedy-thriller A Girl’s Birthday. A good example of Kidman’s penchant for eclectic projects, the underrated Jez Butterworth movie saw Kidman in the role of elegant and mysterious Russian bride “Nadia”. Through mysterious, elusive, tragic, and seductive roles, Kidman effortlessly starred in a role often overlooked when discussing her career.

Watches (2002)

Director: Stephen Daldry

Watches (2002)

Always the one who inhabits a character entirely, Kidman literally and figuratively vanished as the afflicted modernist writer Virginia Woolf in Stephen Daldry’s adaptation of Michael Cunningham’s 1998 novel The Hours. With her facial features buried under synthetic make-up to recreate Wolff’s defining traits, Kidman sets out to convey the emotional talent and emotional turmoil that consumed Wolff and ultimately led her to commit suicide. A multi-award winning film, The Hours saw Kidman receive the 2003 Academy Award for Best Actress.

Dogville (2003)

Director: Lars von Trier

Dogville (2003)

Following her award-winning role in The Hours, Kidman gave an equally leading performance as Grace Margaret Mulligan in Lars von Trier’s Dogville. A simple three-hour-long drama, Von Trier’s self-contained fable sees Kidman’s central protagonist seek shelter from the mob in the small American town of Dogville. Leading the cast that included the likes of Lauren Bacall, James Caan and Ben Gazzara, Kidman was praised for her role in this challenging Bristian proverb, whose stylistic style impressed many.

Birth (2004)

Director: Jonathan Glazer

Birth (2004)

By accepting the lead role of Anna in Jonathan Glazer’s ill-fated story of reincarnation and eternal love, Kidman committed to a project that would attract controversy and divide critics and audiences alike. A tough and witty drama with metaphysical leanings, “Birth” arguably included scenes in which Kidman and her 10-year-old co-star, Cameron Bright, kiss and share a bathtub—both of which are integrally sequential in the narrative course. As with Dogville, Birth may have had its critics, but Kidman’s emotionally accurate performance earned rich critical acclaim.

Paper Boy (2012)

Paper Boy (2012)

It’s fair to say that Lee Daniel’s earthy and divisive critically acclaimed drama The Paperboy provided Kidman the opportunity to indulge her wild side. Like Charlotte Bliss, Kidman was notorious for urinating on Zac Efron’s Jack Jansen to relieve a jellyfish sting, as well as participating in a highly inappropriate public frenzy of dirty talk with convicted murderer John Cusack and Hilary Van Witter. Kidman’s award-nominated role was a beautiful refutation of the media-led image of the actor being cold or somewhat aloof.

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