Double Movies – 10 times when two very similar movies got together

Churchill / The Darkest Hour (2017)

The twin films—two features released in quick succession that bear striking resemblance to each other—are an interesting cinematic phenomenon. They may appear by chance or by design: The Truman Show (1998) and EDtv (1999), both of which are about a man whose life is filmed against the clock for a TV A show, independently just happened to capitalize on the then-nascent fascination with reality television; While 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992) and Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (1992) were competing in the Christopher Columbus films, from two different studios, they premiered around the same time—to coincide with the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage to America.

In recent months, we’ve seen Jonathan Tiplitsky’s wartime biographical film Churchill, quickly followed by Joe Wright’s Winston Churchill drama, Darkest Hour. Decide for yourself whether Brian Cox or Gary Oldman makes the most convincing British impersonation eveningbut – in the meantime – here are 10 other pairs of cinematic doppelgangers who made two compelling films about the same story.

Get the latest from BFI

Sign up for BFI news, features, videos and podcasts.

Dr. Strangelove / Fail-Safe (1964)

Dr. Strangelove / Fail-Safe (1964)

Two years after the Cuban Missile Crisis, and in the midst of the panic of the Cold War, Hollywood produced two films about nuclear war. And they both asked a similar question: Should humanity’s standing on the edge of its own mortality be considered a horrific madness or a cosmic joke? Sidney Lumet’s Fail-Safe and Stanley Kubrick’s Dr. Strangelove with the accumulation of mutual assured destruction between United States of America And USSR From the perspective of U.S. military leadership, but where Lumet plays straight up anxiously, Kubrick chooses to take flight, turning the source of Peter George’s Red Alert novel into a bow-comedy based on the trilogy of rigid-turned Peter Sellers.

Nosferatu Vampires / Dracula (1979)

Nosferatu Vampires / Dracula (1979)

In 1979, vampire films based on Bram Stoker’s Dracula were apparently prevalent, with no fewer than five variations of cinematic tales. However, the best shot of the year were actually adaptations of adaptations, with Werner Herzog’s Nosferatu the Vampyre remake. attacker Mornau’s 1922 unofficial Dracula Nosferatu, John Badham’s Dracula based on the Broadway book play by Hamilton Dean and John L. Balderston. The films reflect their own charges: Nosferatu the Vampyre, unsettling and hypnotic as Klaus Kinski’s rat ogre, and Dracula, handsome and seductive as Frank Langella’s sexiest and most manipulative character.

An American Werewolf in London / The Howling (1981)

An American Werewolf in London / The Howling (1981)

Another double twilight help, John Landis, an American werewolf in London and Joe Dante’s The Howling bring the lycanthrope legend into a modern setting with tongue-in-cheek update, intense fear, and their ostensibly combined way of working to unwittingly remove the werewolf from the world of comedy via nightmarish special effects and an acknowledgment of the absurdity of the beast. . The glow of the full moon was visibly strong in 1981, with three additional werewolf films released that year: The Spanish-language Return of Wolfman, The Wolf’s Police Horror, and Full Moon Castle.

Back to the Future (1985) / Married Peggy Sue (1986)

Back to the Future / Married Peggy Sue (1985/1986)

Riding on the wave of baby boom nostalgia that also brought on films like Diner (1982) and Stand by Me (1986), two mid-1980s time-travel films transported their threads from past to present to the idyllic, light-colored days of doo-wop and pompadours . A wonderful classic back in the future, precocious teenage Michael J. Fox threads into the screenplay Fish come out of the water when plutonium-powered DeLorean takes it to 1955, while the weaker side of that coin is Peggy’s more reflective image of Francis Ford Coppola’s Sue Got Married, Newly divorced housewife Kathleen Turner rediscovers her lusty soul after she faints at a high school reunion and wakes up in 1960 as a teen.

Kalifornia (1993) / Natural Born Killers (1994)

Kalifornia / Natural Born Killers (1993/1994)

The murders of teenage lovers Charles Starkweather and Caryl Ann Fogat have proven so irresistible to cinema over the years that Hollywood at one point released two murder-based films in less than a year — linked narratively but stylistically separate. If Kalifornia is a road movie, full of violence and backed by Brad Pitt’s egotistical turn, Natural Born Killers is a 200-mph outing, dreamed up by Quentin Tarantino and directed by Oliver Stone in his most creative form. Curiously, both films star Juliette Lewis as Fogatti.

Antz / A Bug’s Life (1998)

Antz / A Bug’s Life (1998)

Not the only couple to emerge from the competition between animation roles Pixar and Dreamworks – see also Finding Nemo (2003) and Shark Tale (2004) – Antz and A Bug’s Life have been a source of contention between Pixar/Dreamworks. With each side claiming they had the original idea, studios worked separately on their stories of an ordinary ant making a name for itself in a colony of millions, which eventually appeared as two well-made animations, both somewhat ambivalent about the value of cooperation and individuals breaking away from the crowd to become heroes. are exceptional.

Capote (2005) / Infamous (2006)

Cabot / Notorious (2005/2006)

Often with doubles movies, the last couple released tends to be the movie that suffers commercially. So it went with Douglas McGrath’s Infamous, a star-studded biographical film that failed to garner much attention after indie Miller Capote had already sated those looking for the story of how Truman Capote came to write In Cold Blood. Capote has garnered the awards attention, but which movie is “best” depends largely on which performance you think best embodies the controversial author: Philip Seymour Hoffman’s disastrous embodiment or Toby Jones’ superhero imitation.

Prestige / Deceiver (2006)

Prestige / Deceiver (2006)

Christopher Nolan The Prestige and Neil Burger’s The Illusionist, both historical films about brilliant witches of the 19th century, flaunt Oscar-nominated illuminated photography and tell obsessive tales in a world where ‘real magic’ may exist, but the two eventually diverge in their conclusions. When The Illusionist teases the supernatural only to finally reveal that his allusion to the supernatural was a hoax all along, The Prestige seems to point us toward logical explanations, only for Nolan to recalibrate his thriller as supernatural horror with the last shot. .

The Blitz (2011) / Dredd (2012)

The Blitz (2011) / Dredd (2012)

Gareth Evans’ relentless martial arts film The Raid and Pete Travis’s sci-fi comic book Dredd may occupy different worlds and genres, but once they stick to their lonely towering positions, they’re almost one and the same: gritty and extremely violent action movies confined to a high-rise building Crawls with criminals and murderous assassins. Both include the premise that the law’s outnumbered heroes can only leave the building by fighting their way to the higher levels to the grand boss at the top.

Kristen / Kate Plays Kristen (2016)

Kristen / Kate Plays Kristen (2016)

Both the 2016 Sundance premiere, Kristen by Antonio Campos and Kate Blaze by Robert Greene, Kristen tries to get to the psychological root of Kristen Chopok, the Florida news anchor who shot herself in 1974 live. The two films complement each other, each offering insight that no other can: While Kristen is an honest, sometimes painfully autobiographical, set during the final weeks of Chopok (Rebecca Hall)’s life as depression and neurosis worsen, the Kate Plays documentary follows the actress. Kate Lyn Sheil as she enters the role of Chubbuck, gradually eroding the mystery through her research preparations and method.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.